No More Crying Wolf in Washington

“Where winter wolves bark amid wastes of snow and ice-clad trees.” (Whitman, Walt. “Song of Myself.” 1855.) For almost eighty years wolves were absent from the Cascade Mountains. In 2008, gray wolves began recolonizing the northwestern United States and reestablishing packs in Washington. Four years later, the University of Washington, the USDA Forest Service, and …

Weekly Update: Washington Wolf Project

In 2013, SCI Foundation partnered with the Washington Wolf Project. Researchers from the University of Washington launched the Washington Wolf Project to study how deer behaviorally respond to the presence and absence of wolves, as well as deer survival. The project’s key focus is to investigate how re-colonizing gray wolves are impacting mule and white-tailed …

Issue of the Week: Fire Fallout

Conservationists are concerned about the fate of wildlife after being displaced by catastrophic wildfires burning throughout the Western United States.  Many species have grown accustomed to sporadic fire damage and often remain and graze on the fringe of burning areas. However, recent burns have been frequent and extensive, overrunning species’ primary ranges. Large fires consume …

Mountain goat genetics in the Cascades

Mountain goats are an icon of the rugged Cascade high country for outdoor and wildlife enthusiasts, including hunters. The species also has great cultural significance to people living in Washington State.   Unfortunately, the Washington mountain goat population has declined drastically since the 1950’s. While the decline has been attributed to historical overharvest, many populations within …